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Nicotinic acid: a lipid-lowering agent with unrealized potential

Abstract

Nicotinic acid is a well-known treatment for dyslipidemia in adults. This review article explored not only the role of nicotinic acid in dyslipidemia but also its role in hypertension and as a cardioprotective agent. Adverse effects in association with nicotinic acid use are described with a focus on flushing, the major reason for the discontinuation of nicotinic acid therapy. The role of nicotinic acid receptor in mediating its metabolic and vascular effects is also reviewed.

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Correspondence to Samar H. Aboulsoud MBBCH, MSc, MD.

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Aboulsoud, S.H. Nicotinic acid: a lipid-lowering agent with unrealized potential. Egypt J Intern Med 26, 1–5 (2014). https://doi.org/10.4103/1110-7782.132881

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Keywords

  • cardiovascular protection
  • dyslipidemia
  • flushing
  • nicotinic acid